character encoding utf-8

Which character encoding should I use for my content, and how do I apply it to my content?

Content is composed of a sequence of characters. Characters represent letters of the alphabet, punctuation, etc. But content is stored in a computer as a sequence of bytes, which are numeric values. Sometimes more than one byte is used to represent a single character. Like codes used in espionage, the way that the sequence of bytes is converted to characters depends on what key was used to encode the text. In this context, that key is called a character encoding.

Why use UTF-8?

An HTML page can only be in one encoding. You cannot encode different parts of a document in different encodings.

A Unicode-based encoding such as UTF-8 can support many languages and can accommodate pages and forms in any mixture of those languages. Its use also eliminates the need for server-side logic to individually determine the character encoding for each page served or each incoming form submission. This significantly reduces the complexity of dealing with a multilingual site or application.

There are three different Unicode character encodings: UTF-8, UTF-16 and UTF-32. Of these three, only UTF-8 should be used for Web content. The HTML5 specification says “Authors are encouraged to use UTF-8. Conformance checkers may advise authors against using legacy encodings. Authoring tools should default to using UTF-8 for newly-created documents.”

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